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Tuesday, May 21, 2024

May 21, 2024

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LOADING AND UNLOADING

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LOADING AND UNLOADING
RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LOADING AND UNLOADING

Loading and unloading operations are essential in many industries, but they also carry inherent risks. These risks can cause injuries to workers, damage to products, and even pose dangers to bystanders.

A risk assessment for loading and unloading is a crucial first step in mitigating these risks. This assessment involves identifying potential hazards, evaluating their likelihood and severity, and then implementing controls to minimize the chance of an incident.

By proactively addressing these risks, businesses can ensure the safety of their employees, protect their products, and promote a smooth and efficient operation.


1.  Workplace/Activity/ Process/ Equipment/Materials


  • Checking the site.
  • Equipment Mobilization.
  • Installing the Lifting equipment/lifting gears.
  • Working close to heavy elements.
  • Lifting Operation.
  • Housekeeping.

2.  Hazards

  • Falling, Slipping, and tripping
  • Collision, unsecured load, Hit
  • Slips, falling from height. Incompetent Rigger.
  • Moving Plant, Machinery, and Elements. Persons being struck by the suspended load. Persons being struck by moving equipment.
  • Lifting equipment failure.
  • Load Dislodgement.
  • Uncontrolled movement of the load
  • Communication breakdown and language barrier
  • (Misunderstanding).
  • Unplanned lifting operation
  • Trip / Slip / Fall


3.  Risks Issue (Possible incident) [What can go wrong] (Accident/ill health to persons, fire or property loss)

  • Personal injury.
  • Personal, Equipment, Load, or nearby structure.
  • Damage to equipment/lifting Gears or nearby structures, (serious injury or fatality).
  • Serious injury, fatality. Collapse or asset damage
  • Damaged load or nearby structures.
  • The use of the Tagline to control the load.
  • Taking suitable measures to the weather conditions (wind speed, visibility, thunders, and storms).
  • The operator shall refrain from unexpected maneuvers.
  • The lifting operator shall be certified, competent, and experienced.
  • Serious injury, fatality, Assets Damaged, or nearby structures Collapse


4.  Existing Controls

  • Proper housekeeping, Signs, and barricade
  • Ensure Tool Box Talk.
  • The driver should be competent and have all documents (Local Driving license, operator license, etc.).
  • Maintain road speed limit when using access roads.
  • With a valid third-party inspection certificate.
  • The area should be barricaded and signs should be in place. Proper W@H equipments.
  • All lifting gear must undergo a thorough inspection and certification by a qualified third-party inspection (TPI) company to ensure compliance with safety regulations and maximum load capacity.
  • Before installation, the designated area must be entirely cleared of any nearby structures, personnel, or equipment that could obstruct the safe operation of the lifting equipment.
  • Never approach any moving machinery or equipment until you have confirmed that the operator or banksman is aware of your presence and has acknowledged you.
  • High-visibility clothing (Hi-Vis) is mandatory for all personnel on-site at all times. Additionally, all machinery must be equipped with functioning reverse beepers.
  • Workers must maintain a safe distance from any moving machinery. Only approach the machinery when signaled by the designated operator.
  • The appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be worn by all personnel at all times, as outlined in the site's safety protocols.
  • A color-coding system should be implemented to identify the capacity of each lifting equipment/gear.
  • Conduct a thorough visual inspection of all lifting equipment/gear before use to identify any potential damage or defects.
  • Ensure proper rigging procedures are followed for safe and secure lifting operations.
  • Checklist to be used.
  • Certified, Competent, and well-experienced team.
  • Continuous supervision.
  • The working area is restricted & barricaded well.
  • A competent, certified, and experienced Rigger should be in place to choose the correct lifting gears (SWL and length), C or G for the shape of the load.
  • Utilization of a tagline for load control
  • Taking suitable measures to the weather conditions (wind speed, visibility, thunders, and storms).
  • The operator shall refrain from unexpected maneuvers.
  • The lifting operator shall be certified, competent, and experienced.
  • A competent signalman/banksman should be in place.
  • During blind corners, more than one signalman/banksman or Radio shall be used.
  • Conducting a pre-lift radio communication check
  • The lifting equipment operator shall be informed about the load weight before starting the lifting activity.
  • Halt the lifting operation in the event of any communication breakdown
  • A lifting plan shall be in place.
  • A more detailed sketch for the non-routine lifting operations.  The lifting supervisor shall divide the lifting team by their roles. The designated unloading area will be clearly identified in the lifting plan and subsequently reviewed with the lifting team members.
  • Always use proper PPE at all times. Manual loading and unloading should be limited, not to exceed 20 kilos per person, or use of mechanical means of loading. Clear the area of unwanted materials; keep the area clean and tidy. Barricade the area for unauthorized.


5.  Improved Existing Controls / Implementing New Controls

  • To ensure safety, please refrain from using mobile devices while operating equipment
  • The load should be secured by straps.
  • The ground condition shall be verified by a competent person before positioning the crane (bearing capacity).
  • W@H Training and Drills. Certify and experienced rigger.
  • Prior to operation, perform a thorough visual inspection of all lifting equipment and gear.
  • Flashing Beacons.
  • Competent & experienced plant operators. Assessment needs to be performed for the operator before the usage of equipment.
  • Effective communication must be maintained between the lifting supervisor and the designated signaler (often referred to as the "sketch holder").
  • Only authorized personnel should be permitted within the designated lifting zone.
  • At no time shall any personnel be positioned directly beneath a suspended load.
  • Stopping the lifting operation if the wind speed exceeds 10 M/S can be changed taking the consideration the shape of the load.
  • Tailored Taglines for Diverse Loads: This revision clarifies the use of multiple taglines and avoids informal language ("Using more than 2 Taglines"). 2. Operator Familiarity with Lifting Procedures:
  • This rephrases the second sentence while maintaining the meaning. It uses "procedures" instead of "operation" for a more general and formal tone.
  • The signalman/banksman shall be familiar with the standard lifting operation signals.
  • The operator shall be familiar with the lifting team members to prevent any composition.
  • I am reviewing the lifting plan with the staff involved in the lifting operation (TBT).
  • The presence of the Lifting planner during non-routine lifting operations.
  • Lifting team members shall be recognized by others.
  • Use a Dust mask or spraying water to control dust.

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Monday, May 20, 2024

May 20, 2024

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WELDING, CUTTING, GRINDING


RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WELDING, CUTTING, GRINDING
RISK ASSESSMENT FOR WELDING, CUTTING, GRINDING

This HSE document provides a risk assessment for welding, cutting, and grinding activities. It identifies potential hazards associated with these tasks, including fire, electrical shock, and inhalation of fumes. The assessment also details control measures to mitigate these risks, ensuring worker safety during metalwork operations.


1. Workplace/Activity/Process/Equipment/Materials

1.1. Bevelling/facing.

1.2. Preheating of pipes.

1.3. Bevel Preparation.

1.4. Attaching internal pipe clamp.

1.5. Lifting Operations.

1.6. Welding

1.7. Stabilization of welded pipe.

1.8. Grinding.

1.9. Plant Machinery Operations.

1.10. Manual Handling.

1.11. Walking on site.

1.12. Working close to the heavy plant.


2. Hazards

2.1. Entrapment, Falling, Slipping and tripping

2.2. Use of compressed air equipment.

2.3. Use of propane torch kit.

2.4. Use of abrasive wheels/wire brush.

2.5. Flying particles, or discs

2.6. Compressed air.

2.7. Lifting.

2.8. Hazard: Pipe section striking operatives during unloading and lowering

2.9. Exposure to ultraviolet light.

2.10. Electricity.

2.11. Fumes.

2.12. Hot Surfaces.

2.13. Slips, trips, and falls.

2.14. Noise.


3. Risks Issue (Possible incident) [What can go wrong] (Accident/ill health to persons, fire or property loss)

3.1. Lacerations.

3.2. Noise.

3.3. Explosion burns.

3.4. Cuts, bruises, fractures, crush.

3.5. Pipe strike causing injury 

3.6. Crushing/entrapment of body/body part.

3.7. Eye damage.

3.8. Electric shock.

3.9. Respiratory damage

3.10. Worksite injuries from slips, trips, and falls (e.g., sprains, strains, fractures)

3.11. Progressive noise-induced hearing loss to employees constantly exposed to noise Communication difficulty leading to accidents – significant injuries or fatalities from misunderstanding communications.

3.12. Serious injury or fatality as a result of being struck by a pipe

3.13. Grinder-related injuries: eye/face/skin lacerations and entrapment.

3.14. Sprains/Strains.

3.15. Groundworker being struck by heavy plants causing crush injury or fatality or Ground workers being struck by material being lifted by machinery causing major injuries

3.16. Asset damage.

3.17. Fire.

3.18. Electrocution.

3.19. Hand injuries

3.20. Injuries from being struck by slewing loads

3.21. Bone injuries, such as fractures and crush injuries from pinch points

3.22. Arthritis

3.23. Back strain and pain

3.24. Sciatic nerve pain

3.25. Degenerative disc injuries

3.26. Repetitive strain injuries

3.27. Musculoskeletal injuries

3.28. Soft tissue injuries, including damaged tendons, stretched ligaments, damaged cartilage, and muscle injuries

3.29. Reduced mobility

3.30. Cuts to hands while tying wires or from burns

1.1. Personal injury i.e. musculoskeletal trauma, including injuries to the face and extremities, can manifest as fractures, dislocations, lacerations, contusions, and abrasions. Physical injury, death.


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Thursday, May 16, 2024

May 16, 2024

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RIGHT OF WAY

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RIGHT OF WAY
RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RIGHT OF WAY

This document, uploaded by HSE Documents, assesses risks associated with acquiring rights-of-way. It identifies potential hazards during the process, analyzes their likelihood and severity, and recommends control measures to mitigate them. By proactively addressing these risks, you can ensure a safer and more efficient right-of-way acquisition process.


Job Steps

  • Location of existing buried services - Survey.
  • Plant Machinery Operations.
  • Excavations.
  • Use of Chainsaws.
  • Manual Handling.
  • Walking on site.
  • Excavating in the presence of Archaeologist/ Ecologist.
  • Working at or adjacent to public roads.
  • Working close to the heavy plant.
  • Working adjacent to rivers and streams.
  • Driving of posts/stakes for fencing.
  • Clearing and Grading with loader, and grader.


Hazard

1-

  • Broken or cracked pipes resulting in a substance leak. (Specify the substance if known, e.g., water leak, gas leak).
  • Toxic or flammable gases from a damaged sewer pipe.
  • Electric shock from contact with electric cables.
  • Contact with severed fibre optic cables.

2-

  • Collisions with another plant on site. Contact with moving machinery. Overturning.
  • Contact with overhead or underground services.
  • Construction equipment exiting the factory collides with cars on the busy highway"

3-

  • Fall of person or material into the excavation.
  • Underground services - gas, electricity or water

4-

  • Body contact with the cutting blade of the chain saw.
  • Moving and handling equipment

5-

  • Moving and handling equipment Slewing loads
  • Pinch points

6-

  • Slips Trips and fall

7-

  • Contact with moving plant & machinery
  • Contact with slewing excavator falling objects

8-

  • Live Traffic

9-

  • Moving Plant and Machinery

10-

  • Snake bits. Spider puncture.
  • Falls of persons into water.

11-

  • Contact between hand and machine bucket.

12-

  • Explosive remnants of war (ERW) and mine.


Consequences

1-

  • Flood, gas leak, explosion or fire.

2-

  • Groundworkers being struck by heavy plants causing crush injury or fatality or Ground workers being struck by material being lifted by machinery causing major injuries.
  • Asset damage. Fire.
  • Electrocution.

3-

  • Crush Injuries
  • 4-Serious cuts/wounds to body parts Back strain/injury
  • Slips/trips and falls

5-

  • Musculoskeletal injuries: This includes strains, sprains, and pain in the back, neck, and shoulders.
  • Cuts and punctures: These can occur from sharp tools or materials.
  • Fractures: Broken bones can happen from falls, crushing injuries, or repetitive stress.
  • Repetitive strain injuries (RSI): These are caused by repeated motions that can damage muscles, tendons, and nerves.
  • Arthritis: This is a condition that causes pain and stiffness in joints.
  • Degenerative disc injuries: These occur when the discs between the vertebrae in your spine break down.
  • Soft tissue injuries: This includes damage to muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilage.
  • Reduced mobility: Injuries can limit your ability to move around freely.

6-

  • Instead of just "personal injury," you could specify the cause of the injury. For example, "Injuries from accidents including hand injuries, facial injuries, broken/dislocated bones, cuts/bruises/lacerations

7-

  • Serious eye injuries from mud or ground impacts

8-

  • Moving public vehicles poses a serious crushing hazard to ground workers.
  • Groundworkers risk severe, potentially fatal injuries from moving public vehicles.

9-

  • Physical injury, death

10-

  • Severe sickness. Leptospirosis.
  • Drowning.
  • Physical effects of swallowing polluted or contaminated water.

11-

  • Physical injury.

12-

  • Explosion and fire.


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Wednesday, May 15, 2024

May 15, 2024

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STRINGING

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STRINGING
RISK ASSESSMENT FOR STRINGING 

The risk assessment for stringing was uploaded by HSE Documents. A comprehensive risk assessment is crucial before commencing any stringing operation. This process entails systematically identifying potential hazards, evaluating their likelihood and severity of consequences, and implementing effective control measures to mitigate risks. Stringing operations can involve a variety of activities and materials, so a thorough assessment is essential to ensure the safety of workers and bystanders.


Job Steps

  1. Unloading of pipe from the flatbed lorry.
  2. Loading/unloading of pipe by heavy machine to/from stringing tractor.
  3. Transportation of pipe along pipeline route on pipe carrier.
  4. Pipes stored on Bunds.
  5. Placement of pipe in position on the Row
  6. Transport of material with machines.
  7. Plant Machinery Operations.
  8. Manual Handling.
  9. Walking on site.
  10. Working at or adjacent to public roads.
  11. Working close to the heavy plant.


Hazards

1-

  • Operatives being struck by pipe during unloading.
  • Contact with overhead services
  • Collapse of lifting appliance during loading/unloading of pipe.
  • Fall of personnel off pipe/lorry.

2-

  • Persons being struck by suspended pipe causing.
  • Persons being struck by moving equipment.
  • Persons being struck by the suspended load.
  • Contact with overhead services.
  • Failure of lifting equipment/lifting gear.

3-

  • Crushing/entrapment of body/body part.

4-

  • Displacement of the pipe due to the collapse of sand bunds.

5-

  • Slipping of pipe off supports/ Cradles turning over of supports, or failure of securing chains.

6-

  • Persons being struck by moving equipment.
  • Persons being struck by the suspended load.

7-

  • Collisions with another plant on site. Contact with moving machinery. Overturning.
  • Contact with overhead or underground services.
  • Plant in collision with public traffic while exiting the site onto the public road.

8-

  • Moving and handling equipment. Slewing loads.
  • Pinch points.

9-

  • Slips Trips and falls.

10-

  • Live traffic.

11-

  • Moving Plant and Machinery.


Consequences

1-

  • Crushing/entrapment of operator.
  • Electrocution.
  • Crushing/entrapment of operator. Property damage.
  • Minor/Serious injury as a result of fall.

2-

  • Serious injury or harm.
  • Serious injury or death
  • Electrocution
  • Crush Injury [may be severe, even fatal]. Property damage.

3-

  • Minor/serious injury or death as a result of being struck by a pipe or pipe carrier.

4-

  • Injury due to crushing or entrapment. Property Damage.

5-

  • Injury due to crushing or entrapment.

6-

  • Injury or harm

7-

  • Groundworkers being struck by heavy plants causing crush injury or fatality or Ground workers being struck by material being lifted by machinery causing major injuries
  • Asset damage Fire Electrocution

8-

  • Hand injuries, hit by slewing loads, bone injuries (i.e. fractures, crush injuries in pinch points, arthritis), back strain, back pain, sciatic nerve pain, degenerative disk injuries, repetitive strain injury, musculoskeletal injuries, soft tissue injuries (i.e. damaged tendons, stretched ligaments, damaged cartilage, muscle injuries), reduced mobility, cuts to hands whilst tying wire burns.

9-

  • Personal injury i.e. hand injuries, facial injuries, broken/ dislocated bones, cuts/ bruises/ lacerations.

10-

  • Crush Injury [may be severe, even fatal] Ground workers being struck by moving public vehicles.

11-

  • Physical injury, death.


Current Controls Required

1-

  • Chain, slings, hooks, etc. Function properly and haven't expired (referring to certifications).
  • Only personnel involved in the task are to be present at the loading and unloading area.
  • The unloading area is to be fully cordoned off.
  • Operatives establish eye contact with the crane operator or bank man before approaching the area.
  • Slinger/Banskman to be in constant visual contact with the machine operator during loading/unloading.
  • Guide ropes are to be used during the lifting of the pipe. Personnel not on flatbed during unloading.
  • The pipe is not unloaded in high winds or electrical storms.
  • Survey unloading area to identify the location of overhead utilities (power lines, conduits, etc.)". Unloading operations are not to be carried out within the goalpost zone. Storage of pipe and other materials prohibited within the goalpost zone.
  • Slinger/banks man to be in constant visual contact with machine operator during lifting.
  • The unloading area is to be surveyed for suitability of ground conditions. The Safe Working Load (SWL) of the side boom is not to be exceeded, the safe load indicator is to be functioning correctly.
  • Fall protection is in place where a person is liable to fall. Walking on the pipe is not permitted.
  • Ladders to get on/off the pipe lorry.

2-

  • SWL is not exceeded.
  • Loading/Unloading activity will supervised by a competent person area is for authorized personnel only. Only workers involved in lift operations are to be in a ‘hazard zone’.
  • All lifting gear is in good order with current certification.
  • Only workers involved in lift operations are to be in the ‘hazard zone’.
  • To ensure safety, all overhead and buried services are identified and protected before any stringing commences.
  • Height-restricting goalposts will be erected made of none
  • -conducting high visibility material.
  • Goal posts will be erected outside the hazard zone.
  • Where machines are required to operate within the hazard zone a dedicated Banskman/Slinger shall be posted to supervise work activity.
  • Hazard warning signage was erected adjacent to overhead services. A hazard zone is to be created.
  • Only workers involved in lift operations are to be in the ‘hazard zone’.
  • All lifting operations are planned by a trained and competent Appointed Person.
  • All lifting gear is in good order and inspected before the start of the activity.

3-

  • The pipe was secured to the pipe carrier using ratchet straps before transportation along the pipeline route.
  • Personnel are not to walk alongside pipe carriers during stringing operations.

4-

  • Pipe bunds are to be correctly prepared and inspected before pipes are placed.
  • Inspection should also take place regularly to review the integrity of the bunds/stop ends in particular after a period of climate weather.

5-

  • All plants have audible and visual reversing aids.
  • All personnel have received task toolbox talk before commencement and each operative clearly understands his responsibilities.
  • Taglines/guide ropes to be used for the movement/placement of suspended pipe.
  • The placement of Pipes shall be checked to ensure that they are secure before removing securing chains from the transporter/side boom/excavator.
  • Pipes are to be placed on suitable supports.
  • Sandbags and timber chocks/ skids are to be used to ensure pipes are on firm footing, as per good practice.
  • Ensure workers do not position themselves near between a slung load and a static load. Banskman/Slinger to assist at all times.
  • All personnel will wear as a minimum high-viz clothing, overalls, hats boots, and gloves.

6-

  • No unauthorised personnel allowed within operations. Workers to wear high-visibility vests and helmets at all times.
  • Workers are to keep clear of moving machinery at all times and not to approach until signalled by the machine operator.
  • Banskman/Slinger will be deployed to assist in reversing moving plant & machinery.
  • Reversing alarms in every machine.

7-

  • Designated haul route of travel.
  • Right of way is always given to laden vehicles. No speeding or tail-gating.
  • No unauthorised personnel are allowed within operations. Workers to wear high-visibility vests and helmets at all times.
  • Workers are to keep clear of moving machinery at all times and not to approach until signalled by the machine operator. Banskman will be deployed to assist in reversing moving plant & machinery.
  • Keep out of the swing radius of the machine.
  • Fire extinguishers are to be kept in machines.
  • No mobile phone use by drivers while operating the plant. Goalposts, bunting and warning signs are to be put in place at all points where equipment etc. must pass underneath overhead lines.
  • Synchronized movements where the plant is operating nearby.
  • Line of fire awareness.
  • Audible reverse alarms function correctly on all plants.

8-

  • Certified mechanical lifting appliances to be used to carry awkward or heavy loads.
  • Job rotation is to be utilised to minimise the risk of repetitive strain injury and back strain.
  • Tag lines to be used during lifting operations to transport materials into position.
  • Gloves are to be worn by operatives in the vicinity of the work area.
  • All personnel involved in the slinging operation are to be made aware of pinch-point hazards and associated risks.
  • Ensure the line of vision is not obstructed by equipment etc. to reduce the risk of trips and falls.

9-

  • Due care is to be taken when carrying out work. Wear all appropriate PPE.
  • Awareness in the toolbox talks of potential location issues, including working on slippy timber mats, and uneven and soft ground conditions.
  • Restriction of unauthorized personnel.
  • Stay on hard-standing areas as much as possible. No one is working under any circumstances.
  • Housekeeping.

10-

  • Advance warning signs to be put in place to alert motorists. For your safety, please wear Hi-Vis clothing at all times.
  • Lone working is not permitted under any circumstances. Under no circumstances will plant cross public roads without flagmen equipped with the appropriate flag in place.
  • Banskman to direct the plant across the road. Tires or similar to protect the road surface.
  • Roads to be swept clean after crossing is complete

11-

  • Do not approach any moving plant or equipment until you are sure you have the attention of the bank's man or operator.
  • All personnel are to wear Hi-Vis clothing at all times. Reverse beeper fitted in every machine.
  • Workers are to keep clear of moving machinery at all times and not to approach until signaled by the machine operator.


Additional Control Measures

1-

  • Only Competent or trained machine operators are to be utilized.
  • Taglines/guide ropes to be used for the movement/placement of suspended load.
  • Only Competent or trained machine operators are to be utilized.
  • Only Competent or trained machine operators are to be utilized.
  • Machine to have current certification.
  • Ladders of appropriate size/length are utilized by slingers for attaching pipe clamps to pipe ends at higher levels or for attaching chocker-belt to pipe.

2-

  • Taglines/guide ropes to be used for the movement/placement of suspended loads.
  • When working near overhead power lines operators will comply with permits and other restrictions agreed with local authorities.
  • Before you begin work, ensure you understand the safe system of work outlined for this project. If you have any questions, ask your supervisor for clarification.
  • Permits in place and signed off before working in the vicinity of overhead services.
  • Trained and competent plant operator and slinger/ signaler.
  • All lifting gear and lifting equipment are certified and in good order with current certification.

3-

Ground Conditions:

  • Assess the soil-bearing capacity for pipe carrier weight distribution.
  • Use mats or alternative support if the ground is soft or uneven.

Weather Conditions:

  • Avoid transporting pipes during high winds, heavy rain, or low visibility.
  • Implement additional securing measures if inclement weather is unavoidable.

Night Operations:

  • Ensure proper lighting illuminates the route and loading/unloading areas.
  • Utilize reflective signage and markings on the pipe carrier for better visibility.
  • Emergency Procedures:
  • Develop a plan for responding to incidents like pipe roll-off, equipment failure, or injuries.
  • Regularly train personnel on emergency procedures and use of safety equipment.

4-

Bund Integrity:

  • Regularly conduct bund wall integrity checks to ensure they can effectively contain potential leaks.
  • Implement a drainage system within the bund to collect and safely remove leaked fluids.

Inventory Management:

  • Maintain accurate inventory control of the fluids stored in the pipes. This helps minimize the potential for spills by keeping the volume of contained fluid to a necessary level.

Emergency Preparedness:

  • Provide training for personnel on procedures for responding to leaks from pipes located on bunds. This ensures a swift and coordinated response to minimize any damage.
  • Keep spill containment materials readily available near the bund. These materials can be used to absorb and contain leaks, preventing further environmental contamination.

5-

  • Only certified slinger/bank man are utilized. The area of stringing is cordoned off and closed to other workers.
  • All plants are to have only certified operators.

6-

  • Operators are trained and competent. Flashing beacons in every machine.

7-

  • Pedestrians to use pedestrian access routes were provided.
  • Competent & experienced plant operators trained to local standards.
  • CCTV and/or convex mirrors to provide 360° vision for the operator.
  • Flashing Beacons.
  • Heavy plants passed the periodic inspection as prescribed by local law.
  • Establish traffic control measures when the plant needs to exit the site. This will consist of flagmen, traffic directors, and warning signage.

8-

  • All operatives will have received manual handling training.
  • Manual Handling techniques will be enforced on-site during the induction.
  • Use of tongs to handle timber skids.

9-

  • Works to be carried out preferably in Daylight or provide sufficient lighting.
  • Tower lighting will be in place for work to be carried out at night.

10-

  • Appropriate advance signage to be in place for the works to comply with the traffic signs manual as provided by local authorities and regulations. A competent person to supervise the signage requirements and the placement.

11-

  • Flashing Beacons.
  • Competent & experienced plant operators


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May 15, 2024

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR TESTING AND COMMISSIONING OF CHILLED WATER PUMPS

 

RISK ASSESSMENT FOR TESTING AND COMMISSIONING OF CHILLED WATER PUMPS
RISK ASSESSMENT FOR TESTING AND COMMISSIONING OF CHILLED WATER PUMPS

HSE Documents Ensuring a chilled water system functions efficiently and reliably relies on the proper testing and commissioning of its pumps. This process verifies the pump's performance meets design specifications and identifies any potential issues before full operation. It typically involves pre-commissioning checks, operational testing, and performance monitoring. Pre-commissioning ensures correct installation, cleanliness, and proper rotation of pump components. 

Operational testing involves starting the pump with closed discharge valves, recording pressure readings as valves open, and monitoring for overheating vibration, and motor performance. Finally, performance is compared to pump curves to confirm flow and pressure meet design requirements. This systematic approach safeguards the chilled water system's integrity and optimizes its overall efficiency


Work Activity

  • Document arrangements
  • Site Arrangement
  • Working in summer
  • Testing and Commissioning of Chilled Water Pumps
  • Manual Handling
  • Hand Tools
  • Emergency arrangements


Hazard

1

  • Improper & Incomplete PTW
  • Incomplete LOTO procedure requirements

2

  • Slip and trip

3

  • Heat stress
  • Heatstroke
  • Dehydration

4

  • Electrocution.
  • Poor Lighting
  • Spillage of Water

5

  • Injuries such as Back Strain,
  • Bruised or broken toes or feet.
  • Sharp edges

6

  • It may cause injuries such as Back Strain,
  • Defective hand tools

7

  • Fire
  • First aid
  • Dizziness
  • Heat stroke


Possible Accident / Health &Persons at Risk

1

  • Operatives

2

  • Operatives

3

  • Fatigue To involved personnel

4

  • Personal Injury
  • Finger Injury
  • Hand Injury

5

  • Muscle pain
  • Eye strain, headache, and fatigue
  • Stress
  • Minor injuries

6

  • Hand injuries
  • Property damage

7

  • Injury and property damage


Existing Risk Control (if Any)

1

  • T & C engineer will request to the main contractor for PTW before one day.
  • [HSE Documents] will follow the approved LOTO procedure (0000)
  • Proper signage will be provided regarding the testing and commissioning procedures and authorized personnel only.
  • PPEs will be given to all operatives relevant to their job.

2

  • PPEs will be given to all operatives relevant to their job.
  • Access ways shall be ensured by a competent person that all access and egress points are free from obstructions.
  • The material will be stacked properly at the designated place.

3

  • [HSE Documents]-approved Heat stress plan (0000) will be followed.
  • Proper monitoring of temperature
  • Breaks and rotations will be given to all involved workers
  • Easy access to cool water

4

  • The system under test has been correctly installed and inspected.
  • Ensure approved work permit is available before the beginning of any testing 48 Hrs' notice to CCC before the testing and approval shall be obtained/coordinated.
  • Calibrated equipment will be used
  • Tools & equipment TPC to be available at the site.
  • The area shall be barricaded (Physical barrier) and Signs placed for unauthorized entry.
  • Ensure availability of water spill kit during testing of CHW Pumps.
  • The main contractors' approved heat stress plan will be followed.
  • Sufficient lighting will be provided by the main contractor.

5

  • Task Briefing conducted to workers on ergonomics and manual handling safety
  • Training related to manual handling
  • Close supervision by the site supervisor
  • Manual Handling Risks briefed to the workforce by the task in charge before the commencement of work.

6

  • All equipment will be inspected before use.
  • Use of Personal Protective Equipment at all times (hard hats, safety glasses, gloves, Ear Protection, etc.)

7

  • The main contractor rescue plan will be followed.
  • Provision of sufficient and suitable fire extinguishers at the site
  • Provision of first aid box, Stretcher, and eyewash at the site
  • Designated fire wardens team
  • Designated first-aider teams


Additional Risk Control

1

  • HSE Officer to verify/ensure PTW is in place for the T&C activity before start.
  • Proper LOTO shall be secured to avoid any unauthorized operation
  • All the contractors and working teams will be informed and coordinated properly about ongoing testing and their hazards.
  • Third-party certification of LOTO in-charge engineer.
  • Start briefing before starting the activity.

2

  • Housekeeping of area before the start and while leaving the work area.
  • A designated team will be assigned for housekeeping.

3

  • Glucose juice shall be given.
  • Close supervision
  • Proper communication arrangements
  • Training will be given to all workers on heat stress.

4

  • Only trained personnel shall conduct tests.
  • In-house training will be given to the workers.
  • Proper, hand protection gloves shall be worn.
  • The electrical Engineer / Supervisor shall be available on task
  • LOTO procedure (0000) shall be followed.
  • Acquired permit to work from the contractor.
  • In case of an emergency, the Emergency Rescue plan of the main contractor will be followed.
  • A Fire Extinguisher shall be placed nearby in the area of the task activity.
  • Proper supervision of the testing activities shall be implemented.
  • PPEs will be provided as per their job.
  • Task lights will be provided for illumination.
  • A Proper Communication system shall be provided.

5

  • Only competent personnel will be allowed
  • The main contractor's PTW will be followed
  • [HSE Documents]-approved HSE plan will be followed
  • Ensure housekeeping of all areas.

6

  • Task Briefing conducted to workers on ergonomics and the use of hand tools safely
  • The colour code will be followed by the main contractor.
  • Training related to hand tools.

7

  • Task Briefing conducted to workers on ergonomics and the use of hand tools safely
  • The colour code will be followed by the main contractor.
  • Training related to hand tools.


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Monday, May 6, 2024

May 06, 2024

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROCEDURES-HSE DOCUMENTS

 

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROCEDURES-HSE DOCUMENTS
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PROCEDURES-HSE DOCUMENTS


Emergency Preparedness Procedures: A Crucial Step for Safety


Emergency preparedness procedures are a set of outlined actions designed to keep people safe and minimize damage during unexpected events. These plans encompass various aspects, including:


Identifying Potential Risks: 

This involves assessing the local area's vulnerability to natural disasters, technological hazards, or human-caused emergencies.


Developing Response Plans: 

Creating specific procedures for different emergencies, such as evacuation routes, shelter-in-place protocols, and communication strategies.


Assigning Roles and Responsibilities: 

Designating individuals or teams responsible for specific tasks during an emergency, ensuring everyone knows their part.


Communication Protocols: 

Establishing clear communication channels to disseminate information quickly and effectively during a crisis.


Training and Drills: 

Regularly conduct training and drills to familiarize everyone with the emergency procedures and ensure smooth execution.

By having well-defined emergency preparedness procedures in place, individuals, families, communities, and organizations can significantly increase their chances of staying safe and minimizing the negative impacts of unexpected events.


Table of Contents

1.0. Emergency Action Plan (EAP)

1.1. Minimum Elements of an EAP

1.2. Employee Alarm System

1.3. Training

1.4. Review of EAP

2.0. Emergency Evacuation Procedures

2.1. Fire, Explosion, Gas Release

2.1.1. Alerts:

2.1.2. Policy:

2.1.3. Routes:

2.1.4. Extinguishers:

2.1.5. Duties:

2.1.6. Assembly:

2.2. Tornado

2.2.1. Alerts:

2.2.2. Duties:

2.2.3. Accounting:

2.2.4. Workplace Violence

3.0. Emergency Notification Plan

4.0. Emergency Plan for Adverse Weather

4.1. Initial Planning

4.2. Storm Preparation

4.3. Return to the Facility/ Jobsite – Resume Operations

5.0. Emergency Action Plans

5.1. Fire Protection and Prevention Program/ Plan

5.2. Explosion Plan

5.3. Collapse Plan

5.4. Gas Release Plan

5.5. Injured Person Plan

6.0. General Emergency Information

6.1. Work-Related Injuries or Fatalities

6.2. Hazardous Material Exposure

6.3. Violence in the Workplace


For every [Company Name] facility (or site) and at the beginning of each project, management (office or site) will determine the location of appropriate medical providers with input from the company insurance carrier. A call to each provider to verify these providers can process worker’s compensation claims and administer drug and alcohol screenings is required as well. Telephone numbers for medical providers and other emergency services must be maintained on the job site.

All trained/certified personnel should render first aid and CPR, if qualified until medical emergency personnel take over treatment. Gloves and mouthpieces should be available in the first aid kit and used when First Aid/CPR is administered.

Personnel who are trained in First Aid/CPR may potentially be exposed to blood-borne pathogens if a serious event occurs. Every project should have at least one blood-borne pathogen kit. A blood-borne pathogen kit is available (at no cost) from [COMPANY NAME]’s safety department. Although the risk of exposure is low, in the event our personnel administer First Aid/CPR, they are to treat all bodily fluids as infectious. Employees who have occupational exposure to blood will be provided (at no cost) with a medical evaluation.

The Emergency Action Plan is to be developed and reviewed before work begins. Management (office or site) will develop and review the plan with all new employees, when duties change, in staff or weekly safety meetings, and when the plan is revised.

All personnel must know where the nearest emergency medical provider is (as it relates to the facility or site) and how to travel there in the event of an emergency.

All resources will be made available to respond to an emergency. Management (office or site) will ensure that all employees understand what their roles are and what to do in the event an emergency occurs.

Management (office or site) will determine the appropriate emergency phone numbers for fire, ambulance, and/or police at the assigned project. They will be responsible for identifying and establishing the evacuation plan, including designated routes and assembly points.

The first person aware of an event (and able to do so) will contact emergency medical services, fire, and/or police. For all projects, a previously planned alarm (e.g., crane horn, air horn, or other devices) will be used to notify [Company Name] employees and trade employees of an emergency. The following audible alarms are recommended:


ALARMS

A. 1 Continuous Blast A Continuous audible horn (or blast) signifies emergency help is needed near the source of the audible alarm immediately

B. 3 Short Blasts - Repeated series of 3 short audible blasts [3 quick honks and one (1) second off] with a 2-3 second pause between 3 blasts signifies emergency evacuation, notify nearby employees and report to the established assembly area


1.0. Emergency Action Plan (EAP)

An Emergency Action Plan (EAP) must be documented in writing and readily accessible for employee review within the workplace. However, employers with ten or fewer employees may communicate the EAP verbally to their workforce.


1.1. Minimum Elements of an EAP

  • Fire and Emergency Reporting Procedures: Clearly defined protocols for reporting fires or other emergencies to designated personnel.
  • Emergency Evacuation Procedures: This includes outlining the type of evacuation (full or partial), designated exit routes, and assigned evacuation roles for employees.
  • Procedures for Critical Operations Personnel: Specific instructions for employees who must remain to operate essential plant functions before evacuating.
  • Employee Headcount Procedures: A clear process for verifying the whereabouts of all employees following an evacuation.
  • Rescue and Medical Duties: Protocols for employees trained and designated to perform rescue or provide medical assistance during an emergency.
  • Designated Contact Information: Identified individuals (by name or job title) who can be contacted by employees seeking further information about the plan or clarification of their assigned duties.


1.2. Employee Alarm System

[Company Name] facilities or projects must have and maintain an employee alarm system. The employee alarm system must utilize a distinctive signal for each notification type and adhere to the requirements outlined in the Code of Federal Regulations 1910.165.


1.3. Training

Employers are responsible for designating and providing comprehensive training to specific employees who will assist in the safe and orderly evacuation of their colleagues during an emergency.


1.4. Review of EAP

Employees covered by the emergency action plan must be briefed by their employer on the plan's details under the following circumstances:

  1. Upon the initial development of the plan or an employee's initial assignment to a specific job.
  2. In the event of any changes to an employee's responsibilities within the framework of the plan.
  3. Whenever the emergency action plan itself undergoes any modifications.

The site superintendent shall establish (with assistance from [Company Name] safety personnel) the site-specific emergency action plan (EAP) for conditions such as:

  • Severe Weather
  • Injuries
  • Fatalities
  • Fires
  • Explosions
  • Collapse
  • Gas Release
  • Hazardous Material Exposures
  • Violence in the workplace, etc.

These procedures should be developed in conjunction with the local police, local fire, and local rescue authorities. All site management personnel should be trained and/or educated on their role during emergency procedures.

In the event of any emergency, notify your supervisor as soon as possible and then the corporate safety manager.

Public statements shall only be made by a [COMPANY NAME] representative designated by the [Company Name] president at the time of the event.


2.0. Emergency Evacuation Procedures


2.1. Fire, Explosion, Gas Release

2.1.1. Alerts:

In the event of an emergency, employees are notified through a designated communication system:

1 Continuous Blast - A continuous audible horn (or blast) signifies emergency help is needed near the source of the audible alarm immediately

3 Short Blasts - Repeated series of 3 short audible blasts [3 quick honks and one (1) second off] with a 2-3 second pause between 3 blasts signifies emergency evacuation, notify nearby employees, and report to the established assembly area.

2.1.2. Policy:

In the event of fire or other emergency, ALL employees shall evacuate immediately.

2.1.3. Routes:

In the event of an emergency, employees shall evacuate using the nearest available marked exit. Please note the building route maps posted on the premises.

2.1.4. Extinguishers:

The workplace is equipped with portable fire extinguishers readily available for employee use. In the event of a fire, any employee may use extinguishers to attempt to extinguish the fire before evacuating.

2.1.5. Duties:

No employees are assigned to perform medical or rescue duties during emergency evacuation situations

2.1.6. Assembly:

After an emergency evacuation, employees are to gather at the flagpole accounting: After an emergency evacuation, the procedure for accounting for all employees is: Account for what cars are in the parking lot, then account for the owners of the cars.


2.2. Tornado

2.2.1. Alerts:

In the event of an emergency, employees are notified through a designated communication system:

1 Continuous Blast - A continuous audible horn (or blast) signifies emergency help is needed near the source of the audible alarm immediately

3 Short Blasts - Repeated series of 3 short audible blasts [3 quick honks and one (1) second off] with a 2-3 second pause between 3 blasts signifies emergency evacuation, notify nearby employees and report to established assembly area Policy:

In the event of a tornado, all employees should report to a ground-level interior hallway with no windows. Also, use a book or a sturdy object to shield the head and face area.

2.2.2. Duties:

Employees should ensure that everyone around their work area has been notified to seek shelter.

2.2.3. Accounting:

Account for what cars are in the parking lot, then account for the owners of the cars.

2.2.4. Workplace Violence

What should an employee do during a workplace violence event?

  • Call 911 as soon as possible.
  • Leave the danger zone if possible.
  • If leaving the danger zone is not a viable option, then hiding may be necessary. Hide in the best manner available:

- Within COVER – Hide behind or within something that provides cover. The cover is something substantial enough to either stop or drastically reduce the velocity of flying bullets, fragments, and/or debris and that is otherwise safe (i.e. enough breathable air).

- Within CONCEALMENT – If cover is not available, then seek concealment. Concealment is a condition where hiding your presence is the objective.

- If a hiding spot is within a space that has access restricted by doors, attempt to secure the door with a lock and/or barricading with a large number of objects/furnishings (heavy and hard to move is preferred).

- Do not leave until emergency responders contact you or an opportunity presents itself to safely evacuate.

- Notify management.

What should employers do following an event of workplace violence?

  • Encourage employees to report and log all incidents, threats, and potential insinuations of workplace violence.
  • Ensure prompt and thorough medical evaluation and treatment for all individuals involved in the incident.
  • Immediately report violent events to the relevant local authorities.
  • Inform victims of their legal right to pursue legal action against perpetrators.
  • Convene a staff debriefing to discuss the circumstances of the event. Encourage employees to share insights and suggestions for preventative measures to mitigate similar situations in the future.
  • Discuss the circumstances of the event with staff members. 
  • Foster a culture of knowledge sharing where employees are encouraged to contribute insights and best practices to prevent similar occurrences in the future.
  • Offer stress debriefing sessions and post-traumatic counseling services to help workers recover from a violent event.
  • Investigate all violent events and threats, monitor trends in violent events by type or circumstance, and institute corrective actions.
  • Provide an update on program modifications during staff meetings.


3.0. Emergency Notification Plan

After eliminating immediate threats, providing first aid, notifying emergency services (via 911), and attending to the medical needs of any personnel requiring assistance, pertinent management shall notify the following points of contact in the following sequence as soon as time permits and regardless of the time of day:

  • Corporate Safety Manager (770) 834-4884 (or via mobile phone);
  • Human Resources (770) 834-4884;
  • Project Manager (via mobile phone); and
  • Senior Project Manager (via mobile phone).
  • The corporate safety manager (or a representative designated by [COMPANY NAME]’s president) will notify OSHA and any other applicable regulators or reporting agencies should the circumstances of an event require regulatory notifications.
  • Additionally, an event report will be completed by the “Event Reporting” section of this EHS Program.
  • Review the “Safety Response Matrix” section to ensure all steps have been taken for an event.


4.0. Emergency Plan for Adverse Weather

Adverse (or severe) weather procedures should follow a series of steps based on information obtained through emergency services, government agencies, and news reports. Adverse weather typically allows for an advanced notice before impact. A comprehensive plan should be developed to implement precautions in a phased manner. The key to adverse weather planning is communication. The following general steps should be followed at the onset of adverse weather warnings.


4.1. Initial Planning

  • Management notifies all [COMPANY NAME] personnel, trades, vendors, suppliers, etc. of the potential for adverse weather.
  • Based on facility design and/or varying stages of construction, the project team shall continually evaluate and identify the best location for seeking cover or protection in the event of adverse weather.
  • Communicate to all site personnel where the haven to be used in the event of adverse weather is located.
  • Management or the superintendent notifies the main office of the plan’s guidance.
  • For job sites, the project Manager notifies the owner, architect, and other consultants of the plan’s guidance.
  • Monitor local emergency control sites to determine if area(s) should be evacuated.
  • Management or superintendent establishes a Severe Weather Coordination Center (site office) and designates a person as Weather Supervisor.
  • Notify all persons of control center phone numbers or radio channels and the supervisor's name.


4.2. Storm Preparation

  • Secure all building premises and secure all loose objects.
  • Secure site offices and secure all objects.
  • Secure all equipment.
  • Secure or remove all vital records if damage may be expected.
  • Protect all glass panes.
  • Determine if a shutdown of utilities is necessary.
  • Evacuate all personnel.


4.3. Return to the Facility/ Jobsite – Resume Operations

  • Return only after approval by authorities.
  • Perform inventory/evaluation of damages, take pictures, and video if extensive.
  • For job sites, instruct trades to return.
  • For job sites, notify the main office of damage.
  • For job sites, notify the owner of the extent of the damage.
  • Management will initiate notification and communication with relevant insurance carriers, as required by policy terms.
  • A comprehensive safety analysis will be conducted to assess any necessary cleanup operations.
  • Cleanup and restoration efforts will commence, contingent upon the safety assessment.
  • Costs associated with restoring normal operations will be meticulously evaluated and tracked.


5.0. Emergency Action Plans

Emergency Action Plans will vary slightly and are based on the site-specific facility or conditions. That is why each plan must be tailored to fit every facility or project. Whereas 911 is generally the number to dial for all emergencies, some areas may not have the 911 system in place. Management is responsible for reviewing the emergency contact system in each local area before commencing work. This can be accomplished by visiting local emergency providers in the area and discussing variables with them for a facility or at the onset of a project. Doing this will also provide responders with pertinent information about our work allowing a tailored response specific to the needs.


5.1. Fire Protection and Prevention Program/ Plan

  • Everyone is to evacuate the building/job site in an orderly manner and reassemble in a designated location.
  • Notify the Supervisor of the location of the fire so that 911 or the local emergency responders can be called.
  • Supervisors are responsible for maintaining accurate headcounts and the whereabouts of all employees at all times. This rephrases the sentence to emphasize the ongoing responsibility of supervisors in tracking personnel.
  • A headcount will be conducted to verify that everyone has evacuated the area. This clarifies the purpose of accounting for personnel, ensuring it's directly linked to the evacuation process. Compile information regarding possible locations of missing/trapped people.
  • Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.


5.2. Explosion Plan

  • Everyone is to evacuate the building/job site in an orderly manner and reassemble in a designated location.
  • Notify the Supervisor of the location of the explosion so that 911 or the local emergency responders can be called.
  • Supervisors are responsible for maintaining accurate headcounts and location tracking of all employees at all times. This emphasizes the ongoing responsibility of supervisors in monitoring personnel.
  • A thorough headcount will be conducted to verify the evacuation of all personnel from the designated area. This specifies the action to be taken to ensure a complete evacuation.
  • Information regarding the potential whereabouts of any missing individuals will be compiled. This rephrases the task with a more formal tone and emphasizes the focus on locating unaccounted personnel. Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.


5.3. Collapse Plan

  • Everyone is to evacuate the building/job site in an orderly manner and reassemble in a designated location.
  • Notify the Supervisor of the location of the collapse so that 911 or the local emergency responders can be called.
  • Supervisors are responsible for maintaining accurate headcounts and location tracking of all employees at all times. This emphasizes the ongoing responsibility of supervisors in monitoring personnel.
  • A thorough headcount will be conducted to verify the evacuation of all personnel from the designated area. This specifies the action to be taken to ensure a complete evacuation.
  • Information regarding the potential whereabouts of any missing individuals will be compiled. This rephrases the task with a more formal tone and emphasizes the focus on locating unaccounted personnel. Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.
  • Depending on what has collapsed, (i.e. a scaffolding collapse is different from a wall collapse) different actions will be taken. If the structural integrity of the building has been compromised, then stay out until emergency responders are on the scene and then take direction from them. If the collapse is from some external component, then the Supervisor must use his knowledge and experience to assess the situation and direct the actions of the on-site personnel.
  • Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.


5.4. Gas Release Plan

  • Everyone is to evacuate the building/job site in an orderly manner and reassemble in a designated location.
  • Notify the Supervisor of the location of the leak so that 911 or the local emergency responders can be called.
  • Shut off the gas supply if possible.
  • Supervisors are responsible for maintaining accurate headcounts and location tracking of all employees at all times. This emphasizes the ongoing responsibility of supervisors in monitoring personnel.
  • A thorough headcount will be conducted to verify the evacuation of all personnel from the designated area. This specifies the action to be taken to ensure a complete evacuation.
  • Information regarding the potential whereabouts of any missing individuals will be compiled. This rephrases the task with a more formal tone and emphasizes the focus on locating unaccounted personnel. Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.
  • Do not return to the area until the commanding office for emergency responders has confirmed the area is safe to re-enter.


5.5. Injured Person Plan

  • Remain with the victim and provide any feasible assistance.
  • Dial 911 or your local emergency services and report:
  • Jobsite name/location
  • Location of injured within the facility or job site.
  • Type of emergency (injured person, fire, etc.)
  • Number of people injured
  • Type of injury(s)
  • Emergency response unit required
  • Any special conditions
  • Stay on the phone until the response unit arrives.
  • Designate someone to meet the ambulance outside.
  • Once paramedics arrive, notify the supervisor of the event if they are not present.
  • Safety persons/superintendents move to the event location.
  • Assist emergency response personnel in the evacuation of injured persons.


6.0. General Emergency Information


6.1. Work-Related Injuries or Fatalities

[COMPANY NAME] and Associate employees should be familiar with the guidance within Section 5.3 “Emergency Notification Plan” of this EHS Program and know where it is in case of an emergency. This policy shall be followed in the event of any [COMPANY NAME] injury or fatality within 24 hours.

All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, amputations, and all losses of an eye require OSHA to be notified (by [COMPANY NAME]’s safety manager) within 24 hours of the event. If a workplace fatality occurs, or for fatalities occurring within 30 days of the work-related incident, OSHA must be notified within 8 hours of the event

Sub-contracted companies must notify [COMPANY NAME] of any injury sustained on a [COMPANY NAME] project site and submit an event report to [COMPANY NAME]’s on-site superintendent within 24 hours of the event. In addition, sub-contracted companies must comply with all regulatory guidelines as it relates to injuries and illnesses in the workplace.


6.2. Hazardous Material Exposure

There are hundreds of hazardous materials that workers could potentially come into contact with at any given time during a project. The safety data sheets (SDS) books, maintained at each site, list the required actions that need to be taken for each specific exposure. Keep the SDS(s)/ manuals readily accessible and in a location where anyone can get to them easily. SDS(s) should also be posted near or on the job site bulletin board. Remember that it may well be the Supervisor that is exposed so everyone must know where to find the required information.


6.3. Violence in the Workplace

Violence will not be tolerated by [COMPANY NAME] whether, in the field or the office, our employees and craftspeople entrusted to our care expect and deserve to work in an environment that is free from the threat of violence. Any acts of violence are grounds for dismissal and possible criminal charges.


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